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Our neighborhood swans are healthy and enjoying the sustainable island installed last year, and the floating habitat will soon be enhanced with summer vegetation.

After the island was installed by our vendor, Twin Oaks Pond and Lake Consulting, it took the swans a while to get acclimated to it. Ultimately, the swans found it a safe place to rest and even constructed a makeshift nest in early April, according to neighbors Scott Smith and Bill Kula who coordinate the neighborhood’s volunteer swan efforts funded by volunteers.

According to our long-time swan breeder from East Texas, the creation of the nest — constructed of feathers, small twigs and island plant matter — was in keeping with normal swan behavior. However, as expected in their first year together, the swans did not lay eggs, but the likelihood of eggs being laid next spring will increase significantly.

Since the male is a few years older, he displayed various signs of being ready to breed, including acting more agitated than normal as visitors approached the pond dating back to March, which again, is normal swan behavior according to our breeder.

When the male’s heightened protectiveness of the island where the nest, since blown away naturally, diminishes, Twin Oaks plans to install summer foliage and vegetation to replace the native Texas weeds and reeds that withered during longer, colder temperatures in the winter.

In the interim, have patience as the natural swan process takes place and allows people to work on the island without agitating the male.

The primary food source for the swans remains the aquatic plant-based material and algae. Supplemental food is placed in the metal feeder near the western rim so please refrain from feeding the swans any additional food and keep your dogs on leashes when walking around the south pond.